St George’s Mark 1 the converted mosque in Changi February 1942 - April 1943

St George’s Mark 1 the converted mosque in Changi February 1942 - April 1943

Coastal gun, Changi, Singapore Painting by Des Bettany

Coastal gun, Changi, Singapore painting by Des Bettany

The Changi Cross

The Changi Cross

Dr John Cordingly, Louise Cordingly and Reved Henry Khoo with the Changi Cross

Dr John Cordingly, Louise Cordingly and Reved Henry Khoo with the Changi Cross

St George’s Mark 111 June 1944 - March 1945 in Changi Gaol

St George’s Mark 111 June 1944 - March 1945 in Changi Gaol

The Changi Cross and Bernard Stogden

Bernard Stogden with The Changi Cross

Books

Eric Cordingly’s daughter, Louise, has produced two books about his time as a Far East Prisoner of War (FEPOW). The Changi Cross and Down to Bedrock are available as either paperback or digital Kindle editions. Have a look below to learn more about the books, see photos from them and find links to purchase copies.

Please contact us if you have any questions or would like to order several copies.

The Changi Cross

A Symbol of Hope in the Shadow of Death

This little book contains the story of a small brass wartime cross made by prisoners-of-war of the Japanese during WW11 when they and 50,000 allied prisoners were held captive in Changi, Singapore. The cross was then taken up country with them to Kanchanaburi close to the River Kwai when the POWs were used as slave labour to construct the Thai-Burma railway.

“When I received the completed manuscript I sat down and read it through at one go. It is movingly and poignantly written and reminds all who read it that from the depths and agony of suffering, new life may be found.”

Terry Waite CBE

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Purchase / Download

*The PDF download copy of The Changi Cross is provided for personal use only. You may not unencrypt, edit, print, sell or otherwise redistribute the PDF file.

Down to Bedrock

A Symbol of Hope in the Shadow of Death

These recently discovered papers contain the story of one man’s experience as a prisoner of war of the Japanese 1942-45, first in Changi, in Singapore and then upcountry beside the River Kwai during the building of the infamous Death Railway. As a young priest, Eric Cordingly suddenly found himself catapulted into a parish of 50,000 fellow captives.

With an unsentimental and practical approach this modest man set about his pastoral duties under the most harrowing conditions. His diary and secret notes were written when he had no idea whether or not he would survive. This eye witness account and many original illustrations by fellow POWs which he collected and kept with his papers, create a vivid picture of those desperate years.

“The treasure trove of papers had lain ‘guarded but uninspected’ for 37 years. They were discovered only two years ago, following the death of his widow Mary, and have been lovingly and painstakingly pieced together by his children.”

Steve Snelling: The Eastern Daily Press

Learn More

Purchase / Download

*The PDF download copy of Down to Bedrock is provided for personal use only. You may not unencrypt, edit, print, sell or otherwise redistribute the PDF file.


Interviews

Listen to an interview with Louise on Radio 4’s Midweek Programme here. The interview starts 10 minutes and 14 seconds from the start of the recording.

Louise also gave an interview about the book to Ed Stourton on BBC Radio 4’s The Sunday Programme:

Looking back to the really grim time in the jungle camp beside the Railway, the truly remarkable thing was the way the human spirit rose to magnificent heights. After months of sheer degradation, gradually the spirit to care for one another revived, incredible kindness and self-sacrifice was in evidence.

Eric Cordingly